Posts tagged #miyamoto

Starfox Zero delayed until 2016

Creator Shigeru Minamoto took to Facebook to make the announcement:

A Message from Mr. Miyamoto Regarding Star Fox Zero

I made a big decision last week.

We have been developing Star Fox Zero for Wii U with the aim of releasing it this year. Although we felt that the development had been progressing well, we now believe that we will need a little more time to work on areas such as the unprecedented discovery that we want players to experience in the game by using two screens, and further polishing the level designs and perfecting the tone of the cut scenes. While we have already reached the stage where it would be technically possible to release the title in time for the year-end holiday season, we want to polish the game a bit more so that players will be able to more smoothly grasp the new style of play that we are proposing.

To the people looking forward to the launch of the game this holiday season, I am very sorry.

Star Fox Zero is going to bring new game play and experiences that take it far beyond the framework established by Star Fox 64. All the members of the development team are doing our best so that the final product will not betray your expectations. And the game will not be delayed for a very long time – we’re aiming to launch the game in Q1 2016. Please stay tuned for further announcements.

Posted on September 18, 2015 and filed under News.

Learning From The Masters: Level Design In The Legend Of Zelda - Mike Stout on gamasutra

When going back to replay classic games I played as a kid to mine them for knowledge, I always fear that any games from the NES era or earlier are too old to learn much from.

I tend to assume that many elements of modern design will be missing: no training, bad difficulty ramping, haphazard level design, and so forth. Before writing this article, I was under the impression that many “good design principles” I’ve come to know and love were invented during the SNES era and iterated on from there.

The NES was the Wild West of game development, I thought, lawless and free.

So when I went back on Link’s 25th anniversary to play the first Zelda game and maybe write an article about it, I was a bit gun-shy.

As it turns out, I was totally wrong!
— Mike Stout
Posted on March 9, 2015 and filed under Article.

Miyamoto, The Creator: interview with SI.com

I didn't know that Sports Illustrated covered much in the way of video games, but here they are, with an in depth interview with Shigeru Miyamoto.

Nintendo more than any other gaming company features characters that have recurred and been a part of people’s lives for 30 years now. Can you talk about the importance of tradition at Nintendo?

Miyamoto: There are two things that we really focus on. The first is maintaining the “Mario-ness” of Mario. We talk a lot of about what it’s OK for Mario to do or what Mario should be — and what Mario shouldn’t be or shouldn’t do. In terms of what he should do, we’ve always viewed Mario as being a character that should always be doing something new. And then in terms of what Mario shouldn’t be doing, we really want Mario to be a character that people can trust. We want parents to feel that they can trust the character and they can sit down to play Mario games with their kids. We would never use Mario in some type of gambling product. We don’t have Mario engaging in a lot of violence or things like that. We want him to be a friendly character that is welcoming for people.

The other challenge that we often have is that, as time passes and we have younger and younger developers joining Nintendo, they now are at a point where they’re joining the company and they have in their mind their own sort of fixed image of what Mario should be based on their experiences with Mario. And oftentimes they think that Mario should be more child-like because of their childhood memories with him. So when they join the company, they have a tendency to want to try to bring Mario closer to their image of what Mario is or what he should be. Instead what we have to do is educate them and help them understand this is the sphere that Mario exists in and this is what Mario is, to try to help them understand how they should handle the character when developing games.

Catch the whole interview here.

Posted on March 11, 2013 and filed under News.